Interview basics

Interviewing techniques are vital to the success of recruiters who are looking to secure top talent and build lasting connections. Throughout my recruitment experience, I’ve crafted a style that is true to my personality and effective for our clients. But finding what worked best for me did not happen overnight; in fact, it took a lot of practice and repetition. Although there is no universal way to conduct an interview, there are foundations that can help you achieve interviewing success. If you’ve been trying to find your interviewing groove, consider taking it back to the basics with these simple techniques:

Preparation is everything. Before you go into the interview, have a thorough understanding of the job responsibilities and company goals, as well as the resume and qualifications of your candidate. You should be ready to answer all of your candidate’s questions and present a positive image of your company. Being prepared is not only considerate, it’s also reflective of the organization you are hiring for.

Be conversational. You want to create an environment where the candidate can speak freely about themselves. Over-rehearsing can result in a robotic flow or fakeness that you can be sure your candidates will sense. You want to make the interview feel like a conversation, so it will be natural for the candidate to share with you. This will also help you gain insight into their personality and whether or not they are a cultural fit for your organization.

Really listen. We’re recruiters; it’s in our nature to multi-task, but FIGHT THE URGE! Just listen. It seems simple enough, but only disciplined recruiters have mastered the art of listening.  By keeping quiet, you can focus on the candidate’s responses and encourage them to speak of their qualifications. Seek to find out the most you possibly can about the candidate, don’t just get the minimum amount of information without following up. Great recruiters walk the line of being probing, but not intrusive.

Set clear expectations. Be as informative as you can to make it easy for the candidate to envision what it’s like to be an employee at the company you’re recruiting for. Your approach is ultimately laying the foundation of how the candidate will feel about the organization, and whether or not they will fit in. Seize the opportunity to create curiosity and excitement; it creates a positive candidate experience and a lasting impression.

An interview is ultimately just a two-way conversation, but it takes skill and a certain amount of savviness to provide a positive candidate experience while seeking information. Be a savvy interviewer, and take it back to the basics to find the style that works best for you, your candidates, and your clients.

By Danielle East | People Science Team Lead